Co-screening Open Call

Want to be a film programmer? Want to work with us? If you have a great idea for a screening, we’re looking for you…

Matchbox Cineclub are looking for collaborators for an upcoming screening or film event! We want to help encourage more pop-up/independent screenings in Glasgow and Film Hub Scotland have supported us to organise co-screenings this year. We have a small budget that will go towards film licences, venue considerations and marketing.

So far this year, we’ve teamed up with Venom Mob Film Club (Shogun Assassin), Backseat Bingo (Under The Cherry Moon) and Sad Girl Cinema (watch this space!). We’re now opening the doors to any and all pitches for a one-off event.

Anyone is welcome to pitch. However, we will prioritise the following*:

  • Start-up film clubs/series (or otherwise dormant ones)
  • Young programmers (18-25)
  • Programmers/groups from BAME backgrounds
  • Films and/or events that fit our general focus on cult film, not-on-DVD/Blu-Ray/VoD/Streaming/General Release and/or recently screened locally (and yet dead good)
  • Films and/or events with a compelling extra element

What’s in it for you? Apart from covering costs, you’ll get the benefit of Matchbox’s reach/platform/design etc to hopefully launch your own screening series, as well as any advice, expertise and connections we can pass on.

If you have an idea, we’re looking for a short paragraph of no more than 100 words explaining your pitch, with reference to film title(s), guests or other elements, and why your screening is worthwhile. NB “X is an awesome film” probably won’t get too far.

All pitches to info@matchboxcineclub.com, with the subject line “Pitch”. Any queries likewise.

PLEASE NOTE: 

  • Closing date for entries is Friday 14th June.
  • The screening will likely but not necessarily take place in September, as part of the Scalarama programme. Date and venue TBC/up for discussion.
  • Any ticket sales will be managed through our online shop. Proceeds from the screenings will be split equally between Matchbox Cineclub and the successful pitchers.
  • Please don’t pitch us on film festivals à la KeanuCon, Cage-a-rama or Weird Weekend, or any related screenings.
  • We’re not responsible in the unlikely event that you randomly pitch us on a screening or an event that we already have lined up but haven’t yet announced. We’d never, ever steal an idea, but coincidences do happen.
  • For the avoidance of doubt, we already have a very long list of films and events we’d like to programme.
  • If you have an idea that’s just too good to share, please feel free to get in touch separately for advice on how to set up your own screening.
  • We will do our best to respond and give feedback (if requested) on all pitches, but we can’t guarantee it.
  • If you’re an established organisation looking to work with us, best just email us separately – we’re always open to collaboration.

*Because we want to, not because it’s a condition of the funding. NB complaining about this is a useful way to disqualify yourself and your pitch 🙂

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A Basic Guide to Licences for Film Screenings

Ever wanted to screen a film? Our straightforward guide will tell you what licences you need to screen films in Scotland, how to get them and how to get started

When we started screening films we knew there was stuff we didn’t know, or assumed was probably wrong – whether through wilful ignorance or plausible deniability, we definitely didn’t do things correctly straight out the gate. This is true of a lot of film events, and usually in good faith. Briefly, we figured out what we needed to know and that one problem is that there aren’t necessarily straightforward/simple answers to some basic questions. Licensing for film screenings can be like traversing shifting sands from one event to the next.

However, there are basics and we learnt them and this, here, is the skeleton of a presentation we gave in March 2019 as part of Scalarama Glasgow’s Programming and Licensing event at Glasgow Short Film Festival. You can download it as a two-page PDF here.

Why confirm licences?

  • Legally, you have to (¯\_(ツ)_/¯)
  • Threat of fines (and your venue can be classed as a “contributory infringer”)
  • The greater good (exhibitors, film makers, distributors and everyone in between depend on each other to sustain the film industry)
  • Access to funding and other support to help keep doing what you’re doing

These are the licences venues need to screen films anywhere in Scotland:

  • Cinema Licence (from your local council)
  • Entertainment Licence (from your local council)
  • Performing Rights Licence (PRS) (from PPL/PRS)

Depending whether or not you want to plan your screening (e.g. if you want to advertise your screening anywhere outside your venue or online), you will also need one of two kinds of licence:

  • Single Title Screening Licence (STSL, for planned screenings, free or not)
  • Public Video Screening Licence (PVSL, an umbrella licence for unplanned and/or “ambient”, free screenings and/or members-only orgs)
  • NB Filmbank’s Licence Wizard is a handy way to figure out which you need

You can confirm most licences from ‘gateway’ distribution companies who manage large libraries on behalf of major studios, for example:

 Or sometimes licences are held by individual distributors, for example:

Some tips for finding elusive licence holders:

Useful + more detailed guides: 


F.A.Q.

Q: How much is a film licence?

A: Depending on the context and source, it can be anywhere from £60 + VAT to several hundred pounds. Some distributors demand a percentage (often 35%) of final box take versus a minimum guarantee (MG), meaning you pay whatever is more.

Q: Can I haggle/negotiate?

A: You can try. Haggling is more commonplace in Europe and North America than in the UK. And some distributors, e.g. Filmbank, operate an online portal that doesn’t allow for it.

Q: Who will know if I don’t get a licence?

A: Distributors, especially the bigger ones, do keep an eye on screening activity and if they’re made aware of unlicenced screenings of their films, they will investigate. Most commonly, they’ll simply chase you to book it in. Other local exhibitors, including cinemas, will likely notice screenings that seem to be unlicenced too => side-eye and/or bad blood.

Q: Do I need a licence if my screening is free or for charity?

A: Yes. Although on rare occasions you may be granted a licence for free, you still have to confirm permission to screen with the licence holder.

Q: Do I need a licence if the director/star is coming?

A: Most likely. Unless the director is also the licence holder and/or the film doesn’t have distribution, they probably won’t manage the screening rights for their own film.

Q: If I own the DVD, can I screen it?

A: Not without a licence. However, the licence fee most likely will not cover screening materials (i.e. DVD, Blu Ray), which you usually must provide yourself.

Q: If someone released the DVD/Blu Ray, can they grant a screening licence?

A: Sometimes, but not always. The rights to distribute a film for home entertainment and the rights to distribute a film theatrically or non-theatrically are not essentially the same.

Q: What do I do if I’ve exhausted every avenue and explored all possibilities of finding a licence holder?

A: In the very unlikely chance you have (see Sophie Brown’s Point Break saga), there is the option to self-indemnify, meaning you make a record of your attempts to source the licence, reserve the box office take and prepare for the licence holder to eventually come forward. No-one recommends you do this.

Q: Which films are in the public domain?

A: There isn’t a definitive answer or resource for this. Websites that claim to be definitive are not and in any case are often based in the US, which is a different distribution territory that also has different copyright laws. On top of this, the legal status of films often changes over time. All you can do is research.


Scalarama Glasgow is running monthly meetings in the lead-up to September’s season of DIY film programming. They’re aimed at helping exhibitors brand-new and experienced alike to put on films, and each month has two invited experts on different aspects of film exhibition. They’re free and open to all, full details here.

If you have any more questions or could use some advice, get in touch with us here: info@matchboxcineclub.com

 

 

Destination Wedding UK Premiere

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Keanu Reeves and Winona Ryder in Destination Wedding

We’re excited to announce that we’re closing KeanuCon 2019 with the UK premiere of Destination WeddingKeanu Reeves stars alongside Winona Ryder in Victor Levin’s romantic comedy. KeanuCon, Europe’s first Keanu Reeves film festival, takes place at CCA, Glasgow, on Saturday 27th and Sunday 28th April, 2019.

Frank and Lindsay have a lot in common: they both hate the bride, the groom, the wedding, themselves, and most especially each other. For 72 hours, they are trespassers in paradise.  But the weekend’s relentless events continually force them together, and if you fight with someone long enough, anything can happen. When the instinct to love proves very difficult to kill, they must decide which is stronger: their hearts or their common sense.

Destination Wedding is Keanu and Winona’s fourth onscreen coupling since filming 1992’s Bram Stoker’s Dracula – during which Ryder insists the two were married for real (director Francis Ford Coppola confirms the wedding scene he filmed could be legally binding).

Of his character, Keanu says, “I liked his wit and his suffering. You root for Frank. I root for Frank. He’s trying to overcome his past when he meets Lindsay and finds himself attracted to her.” But, on the other hand, “Love is good for other people, but he knows it will just end in disaster for him. So, why bother? Save yourself the pain.”

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Keanu Reeves and Winona Ryder in Destination Wedding

Producer Lyon says, “Keanu has a natural sense of timing and delivery. He is a hilariously funny person with a dry sense of humour and just a pleasure to work with. I think it was fun for him to demonstrate a side that hasn’t been seen before and allows him to show a piece of who he is as a person.”

However, while we’re happy that KeanuCon will end well, we’re not sure Destination Wedding will, especially if we take into account this poster capitalising on Keanu’s recent John Wick success, which purports to be for the Thai release of the film…

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Matchbox Cineclub’s KeanuCon features ten and a half films over two days, including My Own Private Idaho, Speed, The Matrix, Constantine, Keanu’s directorial debut, Man of Tai Chi, and John Wick. There will be a rare screening of Keanu’s first lead role in a Hollywood feature, Permanent Record, accompanied by an even rarer outing for his film debut in the National Film Board of Canada short, One Step Away.

Day two closes with a double bill of Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure and Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey, followed by a live performance from Wyld Stallyns, before KeanuCon 2019 closes with the UK premiere of Destination Wedding.


Weekend Passes for KeanuCon are sold out; very limited single tickets are on sale via our online shop.

Death of the Mod Dream

The £250, semi-psychedelic musical made in Amsterdam, London and Knockentiber

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In 2012, I had been asked to contribute a chapter to the book World Film Locations: Glasgow on underground filmmaking in the city, of which whatever there was was not particularly well documented. Luckily, Billy Samson, who died last week, had just co-directed, with Gavin Mitchell, Death Of The Mod Dream. In the book, I likened their film to “a Scottish no-wave film directed by Roy Andersson,” but really there’s not much like it.

Purportedly based on a 1980 novella – Death Of The Mod Dream, by Edna Barnstaple – Billy and Gavin’s film concerns “a young man out of time who considers himself to be the last Mod on Earth. He lives in the City Of Scotland, a depressed, paranoid, curfew-controlled community with his mother and sister, who all fail to understand each other.” The synopsis continues:

“One day, this humdrum existence is disrupted when he uncovers what he has been led to believe is a mysterious ‘Mod time capsule’ buried on the beach. He takes it home, hoping for at best a wallow through a glorious mythical past he never knew. Little does he know the contents of the capsule are not what they seem and his reality is about to be turned upside down…”

Anyone will tell you making a feature-length film is a very particular achievement, requiring equal measures of talent, inspiration and determination. To make an episodic, blackly comic, semi-psychedelic musical in Scotland, for £250, also takes admirable perversity. Death Of The Mod Dream, like Billy, is a little extraordinary.

The questions I asked Billy in 2012, via Facebook message, were mostly for background research. This interview is published here for the first time, unedited. RIP Billy x


How much and what was shot in Glasgow/where?

All of the indoor scenes at the mod’s house were shot between 2 friends’ flats in Glasgow. The indoor parts of the dream/horror sequences were shot in Glasgow or Knockentiber, depending on where the actor lived, with black bin-liners/green screens taped to the ceiling to give it continuity. The beginning and climactic scenes at the beach were filmed between Irvine beach and an embankment in Crosshouse (for the scooter plummet). The cop sequences were done in a pub in Kilmarnock that was halfway through being redecorated. Extra bits were filmed by ourselves and others in Edinburgh, London and Amsterdam. All the special effects/animation sequences were done at home.

How did you go about picking the locations and did you have any problem getting permission to film/did you even have to ask?

Just had to ask to use people’s houses, which was handiest for all concerned so they all agreed to it. The beach stuff we just turned up and filmed. Only minor problem was concealing the camera so passers-by didn’t keep jumping in front of it.

Can you give me some technical details – budget, casting, equipment used, how long the production took?

Budget worked out at around £250 (probably), which mostly went towards transport costs and endless AA batteries swallowed up by the camera. All actors and contributors gave their services for free, on the condition they’d get something out if it in the event it went global 😉. The bulk of the film was shot on a 1st generation Flip camera a friend ‘borrowed’ from her work. When that had to be discreetly returned, the last few bits were filmed on actors’ own cameras. Casting was straightforward- Adam Smith was such an obvious choice to play the main character we barely had to think about it! Most roles were like that, didn’t have the time or budget to train up ‘proper’ actors (and didn’t it want to seem ‘stagey’) so just used friends for their obvious attributes that would suit the role. Although we did chop and change between cast and crew- some actors were originally to be soundtrackers/effects people and vice versa. Filming started early June and the final edit was around early October. The editing + effects (and waiting for other parties’ contributions) took substantially longer than the live-action filming.

Did you have any support or advice from institutions/individuals or funding at all?

We never approached anyone for funding, mostly through not knowing how to go about it, but also because we thought it probably wouldn’t be necessary (and a worry it may involve compromises to get access to that funding) considering it would always be low-budget (we had no intention of casting any megastars, or real actors come to that). Various people advised us on certain effects, for example my dad suggested filming a glass of Resolve in close-up for the underwater sequences. Ended up using it for blood cells and cloudy wispiness in the horror + dream sequences (by utilising different filters) too.

What was the inspiration to make the film and do you see it as part of any kind of continuum in Scottish/contemporary filmmaking?

It arose from a drunken night with Gav, the co-creator. We imagined a film billed as the ultimate mod sci-fi experience, but with loads of Phil Daniels/Leslie Ash types storming out the cinema when they discovered all it involved was 3 boring hours of a guy playing My Generation at every speed on his record player then jumping off his bed. But other ideas arose, and gradually we realised the story had a deeper resonance which we could flesh out. Once we took it seriously, it rapidly began writing itself. While of course, remaining faithful to Edna Barnstaple’s original novel 😉. I’m not sure where it fits in, historically. I liked the idea of an ambiguous story which the viewer could interpret as merely having been a figment of the central character’s warped imagination, like Once Upon A Time In America or JG Ballards’ Unlimited Dream Company (the Keith Moon/Rolls Royce/fish tank sequence was subconsciously inspired by the cover of my edition of that book). Plus of course it’s a musical where no-one literally bursts into song, like Dirty Dancing!

Have you heard about any similar projects taking place? I.e. other independent or DIY features getting made?

Heard about quite a few short films, which friends and friends-of-friends have been involved in. I read something about a feature length film in Scotland recently, looking to attract some big names, but I can’t remember much about it.

What’s the plan for releasing and distributing it?

I honestly don’t have much of a clue! There’ll be a premiere at the Old Hairdressers on 3rd Feb, and it’ll probably be made available online at some point. Still to work out how one goes about having it on iTunes and suchlike. Promotion will probably be just the usual haphazard spammy way I plug any records I’ve been involved with!

Will you do another and what if any are your plans?

No plans as such, I never consciously set out to be a director of feature-length films, this one just kind of ‘demanded’ to be made. Particularly once we recruited Adam in the lead role, he insisted we should start ASAP and it rapidly grew legs from there, interrupting a Paraffins promo video I’d half-filmed and have still to resume! But who knows, I’ve had plenty other addled conversations with friends about imaginary films, so there’s every chance another one might demand to be made 🙂.

Sean Welsh


Buy or rent Death Of The Mod Dream on Amazon here (or watch it on YouTube below)

Brothers In Arms Scotland offer support to men in Scotland, of any age, who are down or in crisis and empower them to ask for help when they need it, without feeling a failure if they do.

Jackal Films: The Making of Stiffy

Following our Glasgow Short Film Festival retrospective programme, Two Weirds Is Too Weird: The Jackal Films of Alice Lowe & Jacqueline Wright, director Jacqueline Wright has very kindly allowed us to host The Making Of Stiffy, a behind the scenes look at her 2005 short, written by and starring Alice Lowe. Watch it now, with descriptive subtitles, on our Facebook page.

KeanuCon film programme announced!

Matchbox Cineclub follow up the sold out Cage-a-rama 2 with KeanuCon…the world’s first Keanu Reeves film festival?

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KeanuCon illustration by Vero Navarro

On Saturday 27th and Sunday 28th April, we’re bringing 9.5 Keanu Reeves classics to Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow for the inaugural KeanuCon. Our broad theme is following Keanu’s career from babe to baba yaga, and we have an eclectic programme that takes us from his earliest Canadian roles to his latest world-smashing franchise.

Along the way, we have cult classic My Own Private Idaho, the “criminally underappreciated” Permanent Record and an extremely rare screening of Keanu’s first film role, the National Film Board of Canada short One Step Away. We have his action classics Speed, The Matrix, John Wick and his directorial debut, Man of Tai Chi. We have Constantine, where Keanu is weirdly suited to playing a Liverpudlian occult detective originally modeled on Sting. And – best till last? – a most non-heinous double of Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure and Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey, followed by a very special Keanu-themed closing party.

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Guests and other bonus content will be announced at a later date, but suffice to say we’re working very hard to make this inaugural KeanuCon as stellar as humanly possible. We have weekend passes, day passes and a Bill & Ted double bill ticket, as well as limited single tickets – all on sale via our online shop, here.

The film schedule is as follows:

Saturday 27th April

Permanent Record (screening with One Step Away)
My Own Private Idaho
Speed
The Matrix
John Wick

Sunday 28th April

Man of Tai Chi
Constantine
Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure
Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey

Keep up to date with our Facebook event page here, or join our mailing list here.

 

Two Weirds Is Too Weird

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Alice Lowe in Queen B (Jacqueline Wright, 2010)  © Jackal Films

We’re thrilled to be teaming up with Glasgow Short Film Festival for the first time with Two Weirds Is Too Weird: The Jackal Films of Alice Lowe and Jacqueline Wright. As huge fans of Alice, British comedy and GSFF, this is a very exciting development.

Before Alice Lowe wrote, directed and starred in Prevenge, the triple-threat-to-be teamed with director Jacqueline Wright on a series of strange and hilarious shorts. As Lowe has explained, “Being a woman is weird, and you’re allowed one weird. Being surreal is two weirds, and you’re not allowed two weirds… Two weirds is too weird.” With feline erotica, courtly necrophilia and aspiring mermaids, under their Jackal Films banner the two struck a path for themselves through a restrictive culture.

If we only knew Alice from her cameo as David Bowie in Snuff Box (“man was built but from clay”), we’d be over the moon to be programming this feature-length retrospective of rarely-screened shorts (mostly from 2005-2010). But then there’s her roles in Garth Marenghi’s DarkplaceBlack Mountain Poets, Adult Life Skills, Sightseers, the latter of which she also co-wrote, innumerable cameo appearances (including, most recently, Black Mirror: Bandersnatch) and two series of her BBC Radio 4 sketch show, Alice’s Wunderland. And, of course, that incredible directorial debut, Prevenge.

The shorts made in collaboration with Jacqueline Wright are typically Loweian. There’s parody music videos, melodramatic pastiche and character-based vignettes, where Lowe and her cavalcade of co-stars (plenty of familiar faces) really get to shine. In tone, performance and quality these shorts do prefigure Prevenge and of course they’re part of a rich lineage of short form and sketch comedy. But they also stand alone as exemplars of women-driven creativity, ingenuity and productivity – and glorious, multi-faceted weirdness.


Two Weirds Is Too Weird: The Jackal Films of Alice Lowe and Jacqueline Wright takes place at Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow, Friday 15th March at 9pm. Tickets are on sale here.

GSFF have launched their full 2019 programme – read all about it here, or browse their brochure here.

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