Weird Weekend 2019

Scotland’s cult film festival returns to CCA Glasgow this month, with three days of strange and unseen cinema from around the world.

Weird Weekend, Scotland’s cult film festival returns to CCA Glasgow this month with three days of strange and unseen cinema from around the world, beginning Friday 30th August and ending Sunday 1st September.

Weird Weekend 2019 features extremely rare screenings of lost masterpieces, brand-new restorations and UK premieres of future classics. 13 films and events over three days include a 35th anniversary, 35mm screening of the long unavailable Bill Murray sci-fi comedy Nothing Lost Forever (Tom Schiller, 1984), a rare outing for Tilda Swinton’s quadruple-role tour-de-force Teknolust (2002) and a 30th anniversary outing for the workprint cut of The ’Burbs (Joe Dante, 1989), with extended scenes and an alternative ending. Joe Dante will join the audience via Skype for a post-screening Q&A.

The film programme also includes: Brand-new 2K preservations of I Was A Teenage Serial Killer (1993) and Mary Jane’s Not A Virgin Anymore (1997) from the sadly departed “Queen of Underground Film” Sarah Jacobson, in association with Pity Party Film Club; Vibrations (Mike Paseornek, 1996); Freak Orlando (Ulrike Ottinger, 1981) in association with Scottish Queer International Film Festival; The UK premiere of AGFA and Bleeding Skull’s The Neon Slime Mixtape; Jane Arden and Jack Bond’s Anti-Clock (1979); Věra Chytilová’s Wolf’s Hole (1987); Dead Mountaineer’s Hotel (Grigori Kromanov, 1979) in association with The Reptile House; and the 2K-restored, extended cut of Chris Shaw’s Split (1989).

GIF of Christian Bale in American Psycho alongside a Deepfaked version featuring Tom Cruise, and the overlaid text "ctrl shift face"

Matchbox Cineclub also welcome prominent Deepfake creator Ctrl Shift Face in person for the panel event, Weird World of Deepfakes in association with Trasho Biblio. A specially-curated feature length programme of Deepfakes will play on a loop in CCA’s cinema throughout the festival weekend. Finally, The Arrow Video Cult Film Quiz returns for the second year, with much swag up for grabs.

All films screen with open captions for the deaf and hard of hearing, and tickets are priced on a sliding scale, from £0-8. You judge for yourself what you should pay, with reference to our sliding scale guide.

Black text on yellow - "Sliding Scale: What Should I Pay", followed by three columns of text

You can browse the full Weird Weekend programme on Issuu, and all tickets and passes are on sale exclusively in our online shop.

Accessibility for Film Screenings

Read Helen Wright of Scottish Queer International Film Festival (SQIFF)’s presentation on making your film screenings and events accessible to everyone

At the July Scalarama Glasgow meet-up, Helen Wright (Scottish Queer International Film Festival) gave a presentation and led a discussion on accessibility for film screenings. Helen covered basic principles, and practical access measures for screenings and for marketing film events.

Helen has very kindly allowed us to host the PowerPoint (above), which formed the basis of her presentation. Material from all of 2019’s Scalarama meetings/workshops in Glasgow, including guides to licensing, venues, tech set-up and social media, here.


Scalarama Glasgow is running monthly meetings in the lead-up to September’s season of DIY film programming. They’re aimed at helping exhibitors brand-new and experienced alike to put on films, and each month has two invited experts on different aspects of film exhibition. They’re free and open to all, full details here.

If you have any questions or could use some advice, get in touch with us here: info@matchboxcineclub.com

Weird Weekend: Sliding Scale Ticketing Guide

Sliding-Scale_Weird-Weekend

Passes for Weird Weekend, our cult film festival, are £40 (weekend) or £20 (day), and single tickets are priced on a sliding scale, based on your circumstances – you decide what to pay, with reference to our guide. There are three tiers: Free/£2, £4/£6 and £8.

Download our guide on what to pay here (with thanks to Scottish Queer International Film Festival), or refer to the text below. If you have any questions, please email us tickets@matchboxcineclub.com.

Sliding Scale: What Should I Pay?

FREE or £2
• I frequently stress about meeting basic* needs and don’t always achieve them.
• I have debt and it sometimes prohibits me from meeting my basic needs.
• I rent lower-end properties or have unstable housing.
• I sometimes can’t afford public or private transport. If I own a car/have access to a car, I am not always able to afford petrol.
• I am unemployed or underemployed.
• I qualify for government and/or voluntary assistance including: food banks and benefits.
• I have no access to savings.
• I have no or very limited expendable** income.
• I rarely buy new items because I am unable to afford them.
• I cannot afford a holiday or have the ability to take time off without financial burden.

£4 or £6
• I may stress about meeting my basic needs but still regularly achieve them.
• I may have some debt but it does not prohibit attainment of basic needs.
• I can afford public transport and often private transport. If I have a car/access to a car I can afford petrol.
• I am employed.
• I have access to health care.
• I might have access to financial savings.
• I have some expendable income.
• I am able to buy some new items and I buy others second hand.
• I can take a holiday annually or every few years without financial burden.

£8
• I am comfortably able to meet all of my basic needs.
• I may have some debt but it does not prohibit attainment of basic needs.
• I own my home or property or I rent a higher end property.
• I can afford public and private transport. If I have a car/access to a car I can afford petrol. • I have regular access to healthcare.
• I have access to financial savings.
• I have an expendable** income.
• I can always buy new items.
• I can afford an annual holiday or take time off.

*BASIC NEEDS include food, housing, clothing and transportation.

**EXPENDABLE INCOME might mean you are able to buy coffee or tea at a shop, go to the cinema or a concert, buy new clothes, books and similar items each month, etc.


Weird Weekend takes place at Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow, on Friday 30/08, Saturday 31/08 and Sunday 01/09/2019.

All tickets are on sale via our online shop here.

Keep up-to-date with the Weird Weekend Facebook event page here.

Fan Fan Fanatisch: Obsession in Der Fan

Guest writer Claire Biddles (Sad Girl Cinema) writes on female desire and fandom in German horror Der Fan ahead of our co-screening on July 21st. Beware spoilers!

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Désirée Nosbusch in Der Fan

“No letter today. I wrote to R over three weeks ago, and still no answer. Maybe he never got my letter. Maybe some jealous secretary got her hands on it and decided not to give it to him. Because she could tell I love him more than she does. Really love him.”

Although written and directed by a man – prolific German filmmaker Eckhart Schmidt – 1982 cult horror Der Fan is one of the most convincing depictions of female fandom, obsession and desire in cinema. Its descent into cartoon excess represents the heightened fantasy end point of pop star adulation, but it is grounded in uncomfortable truths.

Der Fan follows German teenager Simone, who is disengaged and almost catatonic as she sleepwalks through the drudgery of her home and school life. She barely speaks, but through her narration we discover the reason for her vegetative state: her every waking moment is devoted to intense thoughts of R, a new-wave pop star who she adores above anything else. Her bedroom walls are covered in monochrome images of him, and she listens to his songs via an omnipresent cassette Walkman that separates her from the real world. She no longer pays attention to schoolwork: “What’s the use? I can’t think of anything except R and how much I need him.”

Screenshot 2019-06-15 at 23.39.45.png
Désirée Nosbusch in Der Fan

The signifiers of fandom are familiar, but the execution is unusual. Rather than a depiction of the (often communal) hysterical excitement of fangirls, Der Fan traces its solitary, destructive flipside. It’s telling that the film’s alternative English title is Trance: Simone’s desire is so all-encompassing that other people fail to register — her teachers, parents, more appropriate romantic suitors. Her unreciprocated obsession is so all-encompassing that it becomes destructive; cancelling out its mundane surroundings.

Simone’s desire has left her with a one-track mind in the centre of a void, wandering the streets in a fugue state. The film’s atmosphere is a dull ache: rain and suburban streets and municipal buildings. R’s music is the kind typically made by inhabitants of these post-industrial landscapes – the soundtrack by Düsseldorf group Rheingold recalls the driving empty urbanity of Joy Division or Bauhaus.

Simone has written R a letter to which he hasn’t responded. Every day she drags her feet to the post office in anticipation of his reply; a voiceover counting the days like a prison sentence. When she tires of waiting, she tracks him down outside a TV studio, and they finally meet. Simone is speechless — she collapses and he rescues her, taking her inside the studio to watch his performance being filmed.

Screenshot 2019-06-15 at 23.43.20.png
Désirée Nosbusch and Bodo Steiger in Der Fan

The link between the devotion of pop fandom and the manipulative power of political dictatorship is often made in films about charismatic pop stars – most recently in Brady Corbet’s twin films Childhood of a Leader and Vox Lux. The allusion is sometimes clunky: in Der Fan, images of mass-saluting crowds are interspersed with images of R in Simone’s bedroom; in the television performance that Simone watches, R wears a militaristic uniform surrounded by saluting mannequins. The sinister creep of R’s power is more subtly expressed in the similarity between R and Simone when they finally meet, both wearing almost identical outfits of white shirts and dark leather trousers. This could be read as a symbol of R’s control over Simone (and others – his secretary is also seen in a similar outfit) but also of Simone’s desire to possess him so much that she literally starts to become him: an under-reported but fundamental manifestation of fandom.

This desire is made explicit (and then some) in the film’s audacious final act. After their meeting at the television studio, R takes Simone to his friend’s empty apartment where they have sex. After this ultimate act of wish-fulfilment, R disappoints Simone with his aloofness – his desire for a simple one night stand not matching up to her overwhelming need for him. The film’s final twist sees her react with extreme and perverted violence.

Der-Fan-poster_web

While committing this strange violence, Simone is single-minded and determined, her demeanour as trance-like as when she was yearning for R at the start of the film. She’s detached and withdrawn, an empty vessel. If obsession destroys everything around the object of desire, it’s no surprise that it will eventually start to erode the self, too. So much of Simone’s sense of self is constructed around her desire for R, and her desire for R is constructed around a fiction of her own creation. Like so many relationships between fan and fan-object, Simone projects her own base needs onto the empty vessel of a pop star. He can be anything she needs him to be. Even his single-letter name is ripe for projection – a hyper-concentrated version of the iconic mononymous pop star. Nobody knows what the ‘R’ stands for, so it could stand for anything. His post-punk voice is monotonous and anonymous, but Simone fills it with subjective meaning: “He always sings with that same voice, but to me it sounds different every time.” This projection is disrupted once Simone meets the ‘real’ R. When the fan-object disintegrates into nothing, the fan’s whole sense of self is in flux.

Although it presents an extreme manifestation of fandom and obsession, Der Fan’s depiction of desire as a nihilistic force is rooted in truth. It can also be argued as a subtly feminist film: its moral could be that female desire is deadly and destructive, something for men to be afraid of — but also that desire for men is destructive for women too. So many narratives around fandom are rooted in pop stars’ potential to ‘save’ their fans, but Der Fan suggests they can just as easily destroy them — or help them to destroy themselves.

Claire Biddles


Der Fan screens on Sunday 21/07 at Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow, followed by a panel discussion on obsession, fandom and thirst, moderated by Claire Biddles.

Tickets are on sale via Matchbox Cineclub’s online shop here, and are priced on a sliding scale, according to your means.

Keep up-to-date with the Facebook event page here.

Under The Cherry Moon with Backseat Bingo

The tale of our collaboration with Prince expert/fashion historian/cult film programmer triple threat Casci Ritchie, in celebration of His Royal Badness

01 Intro Slide

When news of Prince’s untimely death came through in April 2016, we were hosting a mystery screening at The Old Hairdressers. We lingered after the screening to take advantage of the special set-up (brand-new projector and tiered seating brought in for GI) and settled in to scour YouTube for whatever Prince content we could find (not a huge amount back then). Coincidentally, Backseat Bingo, about five years ago, hosted cult film screenings in The Old Hairdressers (films like Cry Baby, Teenagers From Outer Space, House On Haunted Hill and Strait-Jacket). This was just before Matchbox Cineclub started our monthly night there (and long before we moved our residency to CCA), and sadly we never made it to one of their events.

Backseat Bingo was then dormant for a few years, so altogether we were very happy, in January this year, to hear from Casci Ritchie, the brains behind BB, with a co-screening pitch. Casci, also a fashion historian specialising in Prince, wanted to mark what would’ve been The Purple One’s 61st birthday on Friday June 7th, 2019, with a rare screening of Under The Cherry Moon (1986). We jumped at the chance to screen Prince’s misunderstood directorial debut, the follow-up to the acknowledged masterpiece Purple Rain, derided as a vanity project and long overdue for critical reappraisal.

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And it seemed everyone else wanted to do something special for the event too. CCA’s tech staff agreed to climb teetering ladders to add coloured gels to their lights – though the unexpectedly pouring sunshine dulled the effect a little – so the foyer greeting the audience was bathed, albeit faintly, in Prince-y purple. Saramago, the café/bar embedded in the heart of CCA, got involved by playing Casci’s specially-curated Prince playlist all day long, from doors open until our programme began at 7pm, with the best of Prince’s movie trailers. Casci even provided a stash of Tootsie Pops, Prince’s very favourite sweet, for the arriving audience to dig into.

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Casci’s illustrated talk took us on a journey through Prince’s fashion evolution, illustrating his iconic style through photos, clips and her expert knowledge. From his early days as a dedicated follower of fashion, all bell bottoms and platforms, to his instantly recognisable spandex, chains and trench coat, right through to his final years of more relaxed feminine tailor, Casci covered it all. Prince is known for his outlandish dress sense, but Casci gave the audience an insight into just how considered and deliberate his choices were, reflecting his evolving artistic intentions. The audience were then well equipped to fully appreciate His Royal Badness’ outfits in Under The Cherry Moon, and safe to say everyone wanted a backless suit.

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The event was sold out, and we sold tickets on a sliding scale from zero to £8, with an average ticket price of £4.86. That’s worth noting since typically we’d price our tickets at around £4 and so the sliding scale continues to provide accessibility while actual increasing our box office. That’s important because it proves screenings like these can be sustainable and accessible at the same time, and also because it means Backseat Bingo can reinvest in more upcoming events.

Sliding-Scale_Cherry-Moon

Casci also organised a raffle in aid of East Glasgow Music School, a project we felt Prince would’ve approved of. EGMS run on Saturday mornings during term time and offer music lessons for children in the East End of Glasgow, helping build self-esteem and confidence in their abilities. The School provides instruments on free loan to children, and is fully inclusive, welcoming children of all levels of ability and from all religious, racial and ethnic backgrounds. Matchbox Cineclub contributed our share of the box office too, making a total of £225.31 for EGMS.

Also in terms of accessibility, the main feature and the supporting programme (trailers for Purple Rain, Sign O The Times, Graffiti Bridge, our upcoming screening Der Fan and the music video for Batdance) were captioned/subtitled for the deaf and hard of hearing. That’s possible since Matchbox now has a professional subtitling arm, and the intention to caption/subtitle all our upcoming screenings and their supporting programmes (i.e. trailers, etc).

We have more team-ups on the way this year – with Sad Girl Cinema, Queer Classics and Pity Party Film Club – and we’re always looking for collaboration. This year, Film Hub Scotland’s support means we’ve been able to spark some co-screenings to encourage new independent exhibitors/programmers, like Venom Mob Film Club, or dormant ones, like Backseat Bingo, to screen more films around Glasgow. And, if you’d like to start a film night, or plan your own screening series, we’re running an open call for collaborative pitches to help launch your project through a co-screening with us. The deadline for pitches is Friday June 14th – read the full details here. And if you’re more established but would still like to team-up, we’d love to hear from you – get in touch here.


Thanks to Casci Ritchie & Backseat Bingo, Charlie, Kenny Christie, Dee Clark, Alex Misick, Ingrid Mur, Film Hub Scotland, Filmbank and CCA Glasgow.

Like Backseat Bingo on Facebook here, follow them on Instagram here.

Basic Tech Set-up for Film Screenings

Tips, specs and software for perfecting your DIY film screening

At the May Scalarama Glasgow meet-up, Eileen Daily (Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design, Document Film Festival, Picture Window) gave a presentation and led a discussion on basic tech set-up for DIY/non-theatrical film screenings, covering film formats, how to prepare films to get the best presentation and what free software is available to help you do all of this easily.

We’re hosting Eileen’s PowerPoint (above), which formed the basis of her presentation and covers basic terminology, ideal technical specs and useful guides to that free software (plus hot-links to download it).


Scalarama Glasgow is running monthly meetings in the lead-up to September’s season of DIY film programming. They’re aimed at helping exhibitors brand-new and experienced alike to put on films, and each month has two invited experts on different aspects of film exhibition. They’re free and open to all, full details here.

If you have any questions or could use some advice, get in touch with us here: info@matchboxcineclub.com

A Guide To Glasgow Venues

A detailed list of Glasgow venues capable of screening films, compiled for Scalarama 2019

For Scalarama 2019, we commissioned Sam May (University of Glasgow) to compile this detailed list of all the venues in Glasgow that are capable of screening films. The list includes contact details, hire costs, technical set-up, accessibility information and hopefully all the other information you might require (general information on licensing here). We’ll do our best to keep all this information up-to-date, but it’s certainly accurate as of May 2019.

If you have any queries, or to add your venue, please email info@matchboxcineclub.com.

You can also download the list as a PDF here or in large-print format here.


Andrew Stewart Cinema (UofG)
9 University Avenue, Glasgow G12 8QQ (Kelvinbridge Subway)
Michael McCann | Michael.McCann@glasgow.ac.uk
(0)141 330 3803
Licensed for screenings: Yes
Tech: 16/35mm film projection facilities with Dolby surround sound; Video and DVD available.
Capacity: 138 seated
Cost: Technician’s cost of £15ph
Accessibility: Limited wheelchair accessibility through fire exits

Argyle Street Arches
253 Argyle St, Glasgow G2 8DL (Glasgow Central, St Enoch’s Subway)
Abi Crichton | events@argylestarches.co.uk
(0)345 241 6253
Licensed for screenings: Yes
Tech: No equipment provided, would have to be externally hired
Capacity: Maximum 400, depending on space used
Cost: £2,000 plus VAT
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible with disabled toilets. No hearing loop. Guide dogs welcome

Avant Garde
34-44 King Street, Merchant City, Glasgow, G1 5QT (St Enoch’s Subway)
Duty Manager | info@avantgardemusicbar.com
(0)141 552 7123
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Projection screen only – no projector or audio equipment
Capacity: 80 (Basement space)
Cost: £100
Accessibility: No wheelchair accessibility or hearing loop

Barras Art and Design (BAaD)
54 Calton Entry, Glasgow G40 2SB (High Street station)
Harry (Events Coordinator) | events@baadglasgow.com
(0)141 552 6279
Licensed for screenings: Yes
Tech: LED screen, 2.5×4.5m. Built in sound system
Capacity: 350 theatre-style seating
Cost: Free for venue hire, but LED screen hire is £500
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible with disabled toilets

Blackfriars
36 Bell St, Glasgow G1 1LG (High Street station)
Ross McLelland | info@blackfriarsglasgow.com
(0)141 552 5924
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Cinema screen and projector with HDMI compatability
Capacity: 50 seated
Cost: £150
Accessibility: No disabled access

Category Is Books
34 Allison Street, Glasgow, G42 8NN (Queen’s Park station)
Fi and Charlotte | categoryisbooks@gmail.com
(0)141 463 4934
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Basic projector and screen hung from the back bookshelves
Capacity: 30 capacity, 12 seats on site, welcome to bring more
Cost: Pay what you can, suggested is £20ph to cover staff costs
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible, autism friendly venue

Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA)
350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow (Cowcaddens/St George’s Cross subway)
Alex Misick | alex@cca-glasgow.com
(0)141 352 4919; (0)7804 606 954
Licensed for screenings: Yes
Tech: Cinema equipped for 16mm, 35mm and digital projection; Theatre equipped for digital projection
Capacity: 74 (cinema), 144 (theatre)
Cost: Free (if included as part of open-source programme offer); tech hire at £15 p/h for a minimum of four hours.
Accessibility: Wheelchair access; disabled toilet, hearing loop

Cinemor 77
Yurt and Pop-up Cinema, mobile; based in Glasgow
Gary Thomson/Neill Patton| cinemor77@gmail.com
07796996184
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Various Projector screens, High Quality – Projectors (HDMI), BluRay, Macbook, Laptop, PA and speakers
Capacity: Various depending on location & set up, Yurt seats 25 Adults or 40 kids with bean bags, cushions & blankets included
Cost: Hiring fees negotiable
Accessibility: Yurt – Wheelchair accessible

Cineworld Renfrew Street
7 Renfrew St, Glasgow G2 3AB (Buchanan Street subway)
Duty Manager | renfrewstreet@cineworld.co.uk
(0)1413536289
Licensed for screenings: Yes
Tech: Sony 4K Digital Projection systems, with surround sound. DVD/Blu-ray also available
Capacity: 100 seat theatre
Cost: £750 (including film license)
Accessibility: Wheelchair access, disabled toilets. hearing loops

Citizen M
60 Renfrew St, Glasgow G2 3BW (Cowcaddens Subway)
John Rush | citizenrush@citizenm.com
(0)20 3519 1111
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: 6x8ft screen. Projector set up with HDMI and USB connections
Capacity: 50 seated
Cost: £450 per screening
Accessibility: Disabled access and toilets, no hearing loop

Creative East End
200 Gallowgate, Glasgow G1 5DR (High Street station)
Jennifer McGlone | jennifer@creativeeastend.com
(0)141 552 2501
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Both venues have screens, speakers and projectors with HDMI compatibility
Capacity: 40 seated (venue 1), 50 seated (venue 2)
Cost: Hire price dependant on the type of film screened
Accessibility: Wheelchair spaces in screen, no hearing loop at present

Drygate Brewing Co.
85 Drygate, Glasgow G4 0UT (High Street station)
Michael Haughey | events@drygate.com
(0)141 212 8815
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Screen and projector with HDMI compatibility
Capacity: 240 theatre style and 150 cabaret style
Cost: Prices vary depending on availability/notice; standard is £500 + VAT
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible with lifts and disabled toilets.

Engine Works, The
23-25 Lochburn Rd, Glasgow G20 9AE (60 bus to Maryhill Library)
Events Team | hello@theengine.works
(0)141 945 3180
Licensed for screenings: No (but open to applying for one)
Tech: Fully A/V equipped with a PA system
Capacity: 160 seated
Cost: £1,250 (Weekdays)
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible with accessible toilets on all levels

Everyman
Unit 3-5, Princes Square, Glasgow, G1 3JN (Buchanan Street subway)
Claire Miller | privatehire@everymangroup.com
(0)203 145 0502
Licensed for screenings: Yes
Tech: Cinema with screen and projector; DCP, 35mm and Blu-ray
Capacity: 70 seated
Cost: Prices vary on a case by case basis
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible, accessible toilets. Infrared system for audio description and hearing assist

Flying Duck, The
142 Renfield Street, Glasgow, G2 3AU (Buchanan Street subway)
Tom Clarke | tom@theflyingduck.org
(0)141 564 1450
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Screen and projector with HDMI compatability
Capacity: 50 seated
Cost: £30
Accessibility: No wheelchair accessibility

GFT
12 Rose Street, Glasgow, G3 6RB (Cowcaddens subway)
Duty Manager | privatehires@glasgowfilm.org
(0)141 332 6535
Licensed for screenings: Yes
Tech: 2K digital, 35mm, 70mm, Panavision 3D, Beta SP, Digibeta (£50 charge), DVD, Blu-Ray, VHS and laptop (Cinema 1); 2K digital, 35mm, Beta SP, Digibeta (£50 charge), DVD, Blu-Ray, VHS and laptop (Cinema 2); 2K digital, Beta SP, Digibeta (£50 charge), DVD, Blu-Ray and laptop (Cinema 3)
Capacity: 394 (Cinema 1) 142 (Cinema 2) 60 (Cinema 3)
Cost: Prices vary and screens are subject to availability
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible, disabled toilets, hearing loop

Glad Cafe, The
1006A Pollokshaws Road, Glasgow, G41 2HG
Joe, Kim | joe@gladcafe.co.uk, kim@gladcafe.co.uk
(0)141 636 6119
Licensed for screenings: Yes
Tech: Screen with HD film projector and Blu-Ray player
Capacity: 55 seated
Cost: Sunday – Thursday: £100, Friday to Saturday: £150
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible with disabled toilets

Glasgow Guild, The
265 Renfrew St, Glasgow G3 6TT (Charing Cross station)
John, Jonathan | n/a
(0)141 246 1062
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: 1.5×2.5m projection screen with projector (not HD)
Capacity: 60 seats
Cost: Refer to venue
Accessibility: Steps at the entrance so limited wheelchair accessibility

Glasgow Royal Concert Hall
2 Sauchiehall St, Glasgow G2 3NY (Buchanan Street subway)
Laura Curran | laura.holms@glasgowlife.org.uk
(0)141 353 8050
Licensed for screenings: Yes
Tech: 6ft projection screen, HDMI-compatible projector and sound system
Capacity: 100 theatre-style
Cost: £750 plus VAT
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessibility, disabled toilets and hearing loop

GMAC
Fifth Floor, Trongate 103, Glasgow, G1 5HD (St Enoch subway)
Joanna Healy | hello@gmacfilm.com
(0)141 553 5400
Licensed for screenings: Yes
Tech: Cinema with screen, HD projector and built-in sound
Capacity: 48 seated
Cost: £300 (includes license fee)
Accessibility: Accessible building for wheelchair users, no hearing loop

Griffin, The
266 Bath St, Glasgow G2 4JP (Charing Cross station)
Duty Manager | hello@thegriffinglasgow.co.uk
(0)141 331 5170
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Screen and projector with HDMI compatibility
Capacity: 80 cabaret style, 50 theatre style
Cost: £150
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible with disabled toilets

Grosvenor, The
24 Ashton Lane, Glasgow, G12 8SJ (Hillhead subway)
Duty Manager | info@grosvenor.co.uk
(0)141 339 8444
Licensed for screenings: Yes
Tech: Cinema with screen and projector. DCP, VHS, 35mm and Blu-ray
Capacity: 102 (1 wheelchair space) both rooms
Cost: Weekday evening – £500 plus VAT, Weekend evening – £650 plus VAT
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessibility

Handmade Burger Co.
78 St Vincent Street, Glasgow, G2 5UB (Buchanan Street subway)
Ben (Events Manager) | events@handmadeburger.co.uk
(0)121 374 2496
Licensed for screenings: Yes
Tech: Blu-Ray and AVI through a 120” HD 1080p; surround sound system
Capacity: 20 seated
Cost: £100
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible, with disabled toilets

Icebox Arts and Music Centre
Unit 2, St Luke’s Business Estate, Glasgow, G5 0TS (Bridge Street subway)
Jamie (Events Team) | theiceboxglasgow@gmail.com
No phone number, bookings done via email or Facebook page
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Projector with HDMI compatibility, 8.5x5ft wall space, built in surround sound system. Venue also allow external projectors and portable screens to be brought in
Capacity: 80 seated
Cost: £50
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible; accessible toilets pending

ISO
65 Virginia Street G11TS (Queen Street station)
Ciara Dunne | studio.manger@isodesign.co.uk
(0)141 572 9150
Licensed for screenings: No (In the process of obtaining one)
Tech: Fully A/V equipped, screen with projector with HDMI compatibility
Capacity: 40 seated
Cost: £60 for Scalarama screenings
Accessibility: Basement venue with no wheelchair accessibility

Kimpton Blythswood Square Hotel
11 Blythswood Square,Glasgow, G2 4AD (Cowcaddens subway)
Laura Gillespie | conference@kimptonblythswoodsquare.com
(0)141 248 8888
Licensed for screenings: Yes
Tech: Cinema screen with built in speakers and projector with DVD compatibility only
Capacity: 44 seated
Cost: £350 flat rate (includes choice of film and popcorn for attendees)
Accessibility: Wheelchair spaces and hearing loop within the screening room

Kinning Park Complex
43 Cornwall Street, G41 1BA (Kinning Park subway)
Events Coordinator | hello@kinningparkcomplex.org
(0)141 419 0329
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Projector and screen (£10 hiring costs)
Capacity: 75 (Downstairs Hall) 120 (Upstairs Hall)
Cost: £37.50ph
Accessibility: Downstairs hall is wheelchair accessible; ground floor toilets

Lighthouse, The
11 Mitchell Lane, Glasgow, G1 3NU (Glasgow Central station)
Melissa Kerrigan | melissa.kerrigan@glasgow.gov.uk
(0)141 276 5360
Licensed for screenings: Yes
Tech: HDMI compatible projector with a white wall, built in sound system
Capacity: 100 seated
Cost: £195 plus VAT for evening screenings
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible, lift to all floors. Accessible toilet

Loks Bar & Kitchen
16 Newlandsfield Rd, Glasgow G43 2XU (Pollokshaws East station)
Nikki Clow | events@loksbarandkitchen.co.uk
(0)141 632 5727
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: 12ft screen and HDMI projector
Capacity: 180 seated
Cost: £50 plus VAT
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible, disabled toilet, no hearing loop

Market Gallery
334 Duke Street, Glasgow, G31 1QZ (Bellgrove station)
Alice Andrews | market@marketgallery.org
(0)141 556 7276
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Projectors and projection screens available on request
Capacity: n/a
Cost: Venue is not available for hire, event proposals to their committee
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible

Nice N Sleazy
421 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow, G2 3LG (St George’s Cross subway)
James (Events Manager) | sleazys@googlemail.com
(0)141 333 0900
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Portable screen, projector with HDMI compatibility
Capacity: 60 seated
Cost: Monday-Thursday, Sunday: £60. Friday/Saturday: £100
Accessibility: No wheelchair access

Old Fruitmarket
87-101 Albion St, Glasgow G1 1NQ (Glasgow Queen Street station)
Sarah McLeary | Sarah.McLeary@glasgowlife.org.uk
(0)141 276 8441
Licensed for screenings: Yes
Tech: No projectors or screens; technician £25ph
Capacity: 600 theatre-style
Cost: £2,450 plus VAT, with a 10% box office commission
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible, Sennheiser infrared hearing systems

Old Hairdressers, The
22 Renfield Lane, Glasgow, G2 5AR (Glasgow Central station)
Rob, Sinead | theoldhair@gmail.com
(0)141 248 9558
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Screen and projector (HDMI); Sound engineer and PA system
Capacity: 50 seated
Cost: £50
Accessibility: No wheelchair access

On The Fringe
Shawlands Shopping Centre, 126 Kilmarnock Road
Meg Curran | meg@thesouthsidefringe.org.uk
(0)141 632 4200
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Basic screen and projector set-up; £4ph hiring cost
Capacity: 30 theatre-style
Cost: £15ph, or £40 for a 3-hour block
Accessibility: Ramp access to building, no disabled toilets

Panopticon (Britannia Panopticon Music Hall)
117 Trongate, Glasgow G1 5HD (High Street station)
Judith Bowers | info@britanniapanopticon.org
(0)141 553 0840
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Cinema screen with projector
Capacity: 100 seated
Cost: Minimum £200
Accessibility: No wheelchair access

Pipe Factory, The
42 Bain St, Calton, Glasgow, UK, G40 2LA (High Street station)
Verity Hocking | verityhocking@thepipefactory.co.uk
(0)779 531 2291
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: No equipment provided
Capacity: 30 chairs for screenings
Cost: £75
Accessibility: No wheelchair access

Platform
The Bridge, 1000 Westerhouse Rd, Glasgow, G34 9JW (Easterhouse station)
Niamh Tumilty | hires@platform-online.co.uk
(0)141 276 9670
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Projector, 3x4m screen, or 7x12m surface. Loudspeakers
Capacity: 210 seated
Cost: Hiring costs negotiable
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible, accessible toilets, induction loops, scooters and guide dogs welcome.

Rost
49 Bell Street, Glasgow, G1 1NX (St Enoch subway)
Paul Sweeney | paul@rost49.com
(0)141 387 9469
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: 3×2.5m screen, with a 1080p HD projector
Capacity: 60 seated
Cost: Hiring costs are negotiable, happy to support
Accessibility: No wheelchair access

Rum Shack, The
657 – 659 Pollokshaws Rd, Glasgow G41 2AB (Queens Park station)
Shaun Galbraith | shaun@rumshackglasgow.com
(0)141 237 4432
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Projector (HDMI), 230x300cm screen, built-in sound system
Capacity: 45 seats availble, space for 70 with external seating hire
Cost: Hiring costs vary, technician costs £12ph (min 4 hours)
Accessibility: Not fully accessible but assistance available

Saint Luke’s
17 Bain Street, Calton, G40 2JZ (High Street station)
Chae Houston | chae@stlukesglasgow.com
(0)141 552 8378
Licensed for screenings: Yes
Tech: Projector screen and speakers only, no projector
Capacity: 225 theatre style
Cost: £500 plus VAT
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible

Seamore Neighbourhood Cinema, The
304 Maryhill Road, Glasgow, G20 7YE (St George’s Cross subway)
Ross Hunter | rosshunter@centralhalls.org
(0)755 201 1508
Licensed for screenings: Yes
Tech: 5m screen, 6500 lumens HD Projector, great active speakers, a Blu-Ray player and capacity to play straight from a laptop.
Capacity: 129 leather seats, can extend to 200 if necessary
Cost: £29ph for Scalarama events
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible; accessible toilets. Able to subtitle films on request.

Sloans
108 Argyle St, Glasgow G2 8BG (Glasgow Central station)
Rachel Farmer | info@sloansglasgow.com
(0)141 221 8886
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: 6x11ft screen available to hire
Capacity: 110 theatre seating
Cost: £200 Sun-Thurs, £400 Friday and Saturday
Accessibility: No wheelchair access

South Block
60-64 Osborne Street, Glasgow, G1 5QH (Argyle Street station)
Ishbel (Reception) | southblock.reception@waspstudios.org.uk
(0)141 271 4700
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Portable projector screen and projector with HDMI compatibility
Capacity: 30 theatre-style
Cost: £37ph for evening screenings
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible, accessible toilet

Space, The
257 London Road, G40 1PE (High Street station)
Lori Lynch | lori@thespacescotland.org
(0)141 237 1221
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Projector screen, projector (HDMI) and sound engineer available
Capacity: 100 seated
Cost: £20ph with £15 PA system hire
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible

Stereo
22-28 Renfield Ln, Glasgow G2 6PH (Buchanan Street subway)
Ian Findlay-Walsh | monostereomutations@gmail.com
(0)141 222 2254
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Projector: Optoma 1080p, HDMI compatible
Capacity: 100 seated
Cost: £100-£120 for 18+, £200 for 14+ event
Accessibility: No wheelchair

SWG3
100 Eastvale Pl, Glasgow G3 8QG (Partick subway)
Rosie (Events Team) | rosie@swg3.tv
(0)141 337 1731
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: 8ft 16:9 projection screen with projector and sound system
Capacity: 50 seated (Poetry Club venue)
Cost: Dependent on availability and popularity of the venue at the time
Accessibility: Wheelchair accessible, accessible toilet

Tramway
25 Albert Drive, Glasgow, G41 2PE
Dean Browning | dean.browning@glasgowlife.org.uk
(0)141 276 0950
Licensed for screenings: No
Tech: Basic screen and projector set up with built in sound system
Capacity: 90 seated (Tramway 4)
Cost: Hiring fees negotiable
Accessibility: Lift access, accessible toilets on all levels


Scalarama Glasgow is running monthly meetings in the lead-up to September’s season of DIY film programming. They’re aimed at helping exhibitors brand-new and experienced alike to put on films, and each month has two invited experts on different aspects of film exhibition. They’re free and open to all, full details here.

If you have any questions or could use some advice, get in touch with us here: info@matchboxcineclub.com

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